What does being a Python Programmer/Developer involve?


In this dynamic world where everything changes at a rapid rate, the popularity of Python never seems to cease. But have you ever wondered if it is really worth it? If yes, where can it take you? Python, as a programming language is easy and simple to learn. Python cuts development time in half with its simple to read syntax and easy compilation feature. Also, it has plenty of libraries that support data analysis, manipulation and visualization. Therefore, it has evolved as the most preferred language and considered to be the “Next Big Thing” and a “Must” for Professionals. Today, we will discuss various Python career opportunities available for a Python programmer. A Python Web Developer is responsible for writing server-side web application logic. Python web developers usually develop back-end components, connect the application with the other (often third-party) web services, and support the front-end developers by integrating their work with the Python application.


PROIBA Python Training Program


This Python training course leads the students from the basics of crafting and executing Python syntaxes to more improved features such as working with binary data, regular expressions, file operations, and using the extensive functionality of Python modules. Extra emphasis is placed on features unique to Python, such as array slices, tuples, and output formatting.

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PROIBA Python Training Program


This Python training course leads the students from the basics of crafting and executing Python syntaxes to more improved features such as working with binary data, regular expressions, file operations, and using the extensive functionality of Python modules. Extra emphasis is placed on features unique to Python, such as array slices, tuples, and output formatting.

Few Questions that comes to your mind

  • What Is Python?
    • Python is a programming language that’s both compiled and interpreted. Python source files (.py) are run through a compiler and turned into bytecode files (.pyc), which are then executed in real-time by an interpreter. This makes Python a high-level language, which means, in practical terms, you don’t have to write as much code to get as much done when compared to lower-level languages, and most Python code can be run on most platforms.
  • Why Learn Python?
    • The best reason to learn Python is that its commitment to simplicity makes it one of the easiest programming languages to learn. One of the design principles behind Python is a commitment to making the act of programming as enjoyable as possible.
  • What Is Python Used For?
    • So much can be done with Python. Not only is it a fun language, it’s an intensely practical one that’s useful for creating all kinds of scripts and software. Overall, Python is used in web development, data analysis, microcontrollers, machine learning, game development, utility scripts, and rapid prototyping of software that will eventually be implemented in other languages.
  • Is Python Free?
    • Yes, Python is completely free and open source. One of the best aspects of Python is its community-driven development, which is mainly done through GitHub (for checking out the language’s source code and submitting patches) and IRC (where users can discuss bugs, features, and other Python-related topics).
  • How Long Does It Take to Learn Python?
    • As with any programming language, it depends. The more experience you have and the more serious you are about learning, the faster it’ll be. But relatively speaking, it’ll take you less time to learn Python than most other languages. On average, assuming daily practice, I’d expect 1-2 months for a beginner to start grasping the fundamental concepts of Python and 8-12 months to become proficient. An experienced programmer could probably pick up Python and be comfortably fluent within 3 months.
  • What’s the Difference Between Python 2.x and 3.x?
    • When Python 2.0 first came out in 2000, the language wasn’t too popular yet. As more developers started picking it up and using it seriously, flaws in the language became more apparent, but they couldn’t be fixed without major changes. When Python 3.0 first came out in 2008, those major changes were introduced which led to several new features and improvements, but the language became incompatible with Python 2.x. This meant developers needed to refactor their code to take advantage of Python 3.0, and many of them weren’t willing to do that—including the developers of many popular third-party libraries and frameworks. As a result, Python essentially split into two supported versions: the 2.x “legacy” branch and the 3.x “present” branch. The 3.x branch is the focus of active development, whereas the 2.x branch only receives bug fixes and security updates. Nowadays, most of the community has moved on to Python 3.x, and that’s the version I recommend using. The only reason to use Python 2.x today is if your project relies on a library or framework that still doesn’t support Python 3.x.
  • How can I register for course?
    • We have made it ease for you! To enlist for a course visit 'Admission' selection in the homepage. We have finite seats for each Batch. Save your seat by enlisting to avoid disenchantment at the last minute.Or You can click here to redirect to our admission page.
  • Tell me, what if I am unable to attend after Registering?
    • We assure you about your money. You can join/attend for the upcoming batches as per your availability. However, If you are unable to attend you must inform to our helpdesk team as there may be awaiting participants list and another student may be able to take your place.
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